Your Grocery Budget: An Investment, Not an Expenditure

I don’t believe we can truly know the importance of clean food until we’ve seen both sides. The Standard American Diet is not only lacking in nutrients, but it is full of foods that take away the nourishment you may already have.

On the other side of the coin is fresh, local, nutrient-dense foods. These are foods you or your farmer can grow in rich soil. They are the foods that are grown in a diverse environment and have been eaten by our ancestors for thousands of years.

They don’t come in a box and the best of them don’t even have a label. You can grow or raise them for little or no money, but people often see them as too expensive.

You know what else is expensive? Diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and a life-time of sickness.

I know that sounds drastic, but our culture of instant gratification doesn’t take into account the consequences of their actions five minutes from now let alone 30 years from now. Yes, cheap food may be less expensive today, but you know what I see long-term as a result of cheap food?

  • Children battling diseases that only adults once had.
  • Adults battling diseases directly caused by their lifestyle.
  • People with mood disorders and bad temperaments that are caused by what you eat.
  • Soil that is made lifeless. The very soil that is supposed to nourishing the plants and animals that nourish us.

So when you look at a bunch of carrots grown by a farmer who took the time to care for his soil and you notice that they are twice as expensive as the ones in your grocery store do you ever ask yourself “I wonder if I will get twice the nutrients?”

Because you probably will. And how many cheap pounds of meat are worth the runoff from the factory farms that killed two small children when the feces of those animals contaminated “organic” spinach with E. coli?

So perhaps if we could just look at our food bill as an investment in long-term health and the soil that will nourish our grandchildren we could get past the idea that cheap food is cheap. Because it is not, it is costing you more than you think.

Oh, and our grandparents and great grandparents… you know the ones who couldn’t rub two nickels together even though they worked harder than we can ever imagine… they spent two to three times as much as we do on food. They understood that what they ate was an investment, not an expenditure.

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